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  • People Population Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Population Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Population Northern Virginia is on the front lines of a demographic transformation shaping the United States. There has been an extraordinary amount of population growth in Northern Virginia. In 2023, the Northern Virginia population was 74% more than in 1990 when the population was 1,466,350. Population Estimate 2023 2,556,143 The COVID-19 pandemic began in the United States in March 2020 and the emergency declaration was lifted in May 2023. The pandemic changed the country's and region's demographic migration patterns significantly due to the substantial rise in remote work. Remote work is providing people with the opportunity to move to places away from employment centers. Most people relocate for family-reasons, housing reasons, and for more affordable, lower cost of living according to the U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey. Young adult, first time home buyers are the largest, working-age demographic group that are choosing to move to more affordable areas. In the four years since the pandemic, the country has had a wave of out-migration from urban areas to suburban and rural areas or smaller urban areas. The shift to remote work is one of the most impactful societal changes impacting demographic trends in the country and region, and likely will shape future trends for a long time. From July 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021, the nation's most populous areas, including Northern Virginia, experienced significant out migration and population declines. This was the first and only annual decline in Northern Virginia since the Census Bureau annual record keeping began in 1970, with a decline of an estimated 7,800 persons. Nationally, by County, and in Northern Virginia, growth patterns of 2022 and 2023 have "edged closer to pre-pandemic levels", according to the U.S. Census Bureau and NVRC Analysis. ​ Annual Estimates/Trends Decennial Census/Trends Annual Estimates Annual Estimates: Population, Natural Change (Births and Deaths), Migration Annual estimates of population and the components of change (domestic migration, international migration, births, and deaths) paint a portrait of the annual growth patterns in the towns of Northern Virginia. Annual estimates are not based on a full census of the population. Rather, they are estimates based on a compilation of multiple administrative data pieces such as birth records and residential building permits. The estimates are obtained from the U.S. Census, which benchmarks estimates to the Decennial Censuses. Decennial Census data represents the population as of April 1 of the year, whereas the annual estimates are as of July 1 of each year. ​ The 2020 to 2022 estimates are benchmarked to the 2020 Decennial Census. The 2010 to 2019 estimates are benchmarked to the 2010 Decennial Census, and the U.S. Census Bureau has yet to be adjust this series to reflect the results of the 2020 Decennial Census. Until data adjustments occur, annual growth amounts may be somewhat overstated or understated from 2010 to 2020. Decennial Population Decennial Census Data: Population The Decennial Census is based on a survey of the entire population. It is conducted once a decade. The 2020 Decennial Census population was released on August 12, 2021. The Decennial Census regional, county, and city population data is shown in the interactive charts that follow. Key Facts: ​ Decennial Growth In 2020, Northern Virginia's population was 2,550,337 according to the Decennial Census. The population increased from 1,466,409 in 1990, a 74% increase in the 30 year period from 1990 to 2020. Northern Virginia added approximately 320,000 people in this past decade, 2010 to 2020. This is 96,000 or 23% less than the previous decade, signaling a significant slowdown in the pace of growth. However, growth still continues at a high amount. Virginia’s population grew by 630,369 from 2010 to 2020, of which 50.7% of that growth was in Northern Virginia. I​​n 2020, 29.5% of Virginia’s population was in Northern Virginia, compared to 27.9% in 2010. Growth peaked in 2010. Growth in Northern Virginia has slowed since 2010. It has trended down annually since 2010, but it is still large and impactful growth that the the region is facing. The localities in Northern Virginia the growth is occurring in this decade is different in some ways than in the 1990s and 2000s. The preponderance of population growth of Northern Virginia continues to be located in the outer-ring suburbs of Prince William, Loudoun Counties, and the Cities of Manassas and Manassas Park. However, the share of the region's growth that is in the outer-ring has dropped from 65.1% in the 2000 to 2010 period to 61.5% in the 2010 to 2020 period. Arlington has seen its share of the region's growth more than double from what it experienced in the 2000's. Alexandria has seen its share of the region's growth become 2.2 times what it experienced in the 2000's. Intensification of developmental pressures this decade in the inner-core is a response to the millennial generation preferences, demographics, urbanization, transportation and other market pressures. ​

  • NOVA Region Dashboard | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    NOVA Region Dashboard Northern Virginia Regional Commission This dashboard provides basic information about the Northern Virginia community, demographics, and the people who live and work in Northern Virginia. This dashboard is maintained by the Northern Virginia Regional Commission . All data on this dashboard is best viewed on a desktop computer. ​ Check back here regularly to see new analyses and finding. You may also subscribe to the NVRC Blog an d News and Highlights to be alerted when there is new analyses available. If we can help you with your data needs, please give us a call at 703-642-0700 or send us an email . Home Reports/Resources 2020 Census People Education Economics

  • Immigration Entrepeneurship Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Entrepreneurship - Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Entrepreneurship - Overall Immigrants are job creators In Northern Virginia, immigrant entrepreneurs – those who work for their own businesses, incorporated or not – are making their mark locally. 2013 to 2017 Period Key Facts: ​ 47,837 total estimated immigrant entrepreneurs 42.5 percent of all entrepreneurs in the region are immigrants.

  • Economics Median Household Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Median Household Income Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Median Household Income Overall Northern Virginia is known for having communities with some of the highest median incomes in the United States, including the county with the highest in the nation. High median household incomes coincide with the large, thriving business community of the Northern Virginia region. While the median household income is high, it must be recognized that there are segments of the community in need of assistance that live in this prosperous region of the country and that high housing costs offset the high income when it comes to standards of living and well-being. ​ About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation Median household income data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). ​ It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. Areas with smaller populations, such as the cities of Northern Virginia, may have a larger margin of error in the data due to the survey sample size being small. This is less of an issue the larger the population. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and is not considered statistically significant. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If the data has a clear trend then the data from one period to the next can be deemed reliable. Median Household Income - Current Five-Year Estimates All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the five-year American Community Survey estimates. The Median household income of all jurisdictions in Northern Virginia is shown in this graph. The median household income of every Northern Virginia jurisdiction is higher than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States. Out of all 3,144 jurisdictions in the USA, three of the five highest ranked for median household income are located in Northern Virginia, and those include Loudoun County (1st), Falls Church City (2nd), Fairfax County (4th), and Arlington County (10th). Northern Virginia's median household income, at an estimated $140,511 (in 2022 dollars), is higher than 10th ranked Arlington, making Northern Virginia one of the most affluent region's of the USA. Median Household Income - Current ​ One-Year Estimates Those jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more are included in the one-year American Community Survey estimates. The median household income of jurisdictions in Northern Virginia with a population of 65,000 or more is shown in this graph. The five largest jurisdictions of Northern Virginia all have incomes higher than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States. Out of the 837 jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more in the USA, three of the top fifteen highest income jurisdictions are located in Northern Virginia, and those include Loudoun County (1st), Fairfax County (4th), and Arlington County (13th). The median household income of Northern Virginia's five largest jurisdiction together is estimated to be $140,511 (in 2022 dollars), making Northern Virginia one of the most affluent areas of the USA. Median Household Income - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates The Northern Virginia region's median household income had been rising since 1999 until it stagnated in the 2018-2022 period. The greatest upward transformations in median household income, to levels well beyond inflation, have occurred in the Counties of Arlington and Loudoun. Median Household Income - Historic Compared to Current One-Year Estimates The median household income trend, for the regions large jurisdictions (population of 65,000 or more), are shown in the following graph. Key Facts: There were dips in median household income in the early 2010s for some jurisdictions. The effects of the recession from 2007 to 2009 were still causing economic hardships and in 2013 there was federal sequestration when the federal government made large budget cuts. The Northern Virginia region is heavily dependent on the federal government for its economy, so job layoffs during sequestration impacted household incomes. ​ Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, specifically from 2012 to 2019 the trend in the Northern Virginia median household income was upward after accounting for inflation. The COVID-19 pandemic began in early 2020, setting off a wave of demographic changes in the region and around the nation. Notably, NVRC research has shown that workers retired early but generally remained in the region, immigration slowed, and many young moderate to high-income office workers migrated out of the region to work remotely to places that have a more affordable cost of living. The impact of these shifts is evidenced by Northern Virginia's median household income having a downward trend from 2019 to 2022 after accounting for inflation. Policy makers have given much attention to finding solutions and implementing programs for low-income, but the pandemic has manifested the need for middle-income housing and middle-income programs that will allow current and potential new households to afford to comfortably live and raise families in the region.

  • Education of Towns | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Education of Towns About the Towns Data There are 14 incorporated towns in Northern Virginia. For comparative purposes, Northern Virginia counties and cities, Commonwealth of Virginia, and United States data are provided in the graphs. About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation The education data of incorporated towns is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). All of the incorporated towns in Northern Virginia have a population of less than 65,000 persons. One-year ACS estimates do not exist for incorporated places with a population of less than 65,000. All incorporated towns and places in the United States are included in the five-year ACS estimates. ​ It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. The ACS estimates for places with smaller populations such as Clifton, Dumfries, Hamilton, Haymarket, Hillsboro, Lovettsville, Middleburg, and Quantico can be unreliable if the margin of error is large. ​ Only data variables that are deemed relatively reliable have data provided at the town level. For instance, poverty data is unreliable for many towns in Northern Virginia so that data is not being provided. ​ Educational Attainment

  • Education Attainment of Towns | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Educational Attainment of Towns Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Educational Attainment Towns Northern Virginia localities are home to some of the most highly educated residents in the nation. This high education level of the region's citizens creates a strong, flourishing business community. The percentage of Northern Virginia's population age 25 or more holding a bachelor's or higher degree is 60.4%, which is nearly double the United States, and holding a graduate or professional degree is 29.4%, which is more than double the United States. About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation Educational attainment data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and the American Community Survey. All of the incorporated towns in Northern Virginia have a population of less than 65,000 persons. One-year ACS estimates do not exist for incorporated places with a population of less than 65,000. All incorporated towns and places in the United States are included in the five-year ACS estimates. ​ ​It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. The ACS estimates for places with smaller populations such as Clifton, Dumfries, Hamilton, Haymarket, Hillsboro, Lovettsville, Middleburg, and Quantico can be unreliable if the margin of error is large. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and is not considered statistically significant. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If the data has a clear trend then the data from one period to the next can be deemed reliable. Educational Attainment - Current Bachelor's or Higher Degrees - Current The population age 25 or over with bachelor's or higher degrees of the counties, cities, and incorporated towns in Northern Virginia is shown in this graph. All towns, except for Dumfries, have higher percentages of bachelor's or higher degree holders than the United States and Commonwealth of Virginia. The towns of Clifton and Vienna have higher percentages of bachelor's or higher degree holders than Northern Virginia overall. Graduate or Professional Degrees - Current The population age 25 or over with graduate or professional degrees of the counties, cities, and incorporated towns in Northern Virginia is shown in this graph. The towns of Clifton and Vienna have higher percentages of bachelor's or higher degree holders than Northern Virginia overall. Educational Attainment - Historic Compared to Current Bachelor's or Higher Degrees - Historic Compared to Current The trend over time in the population age 25 or over with bachelor's or higher degrees in Northern Virginia and its incorporated towns are shown in this graph. Due to the small size of many towns, the educational attainment data of towns should be used with caution and the margin of error of the educational attainment data should be taken into consideration. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and the data should be used with caution. Graduate or Professional Degree - Historic Compared to Current The trend over time in the population age 25 or over with graduate or professional degrees in Northern Virginia and its incorporated towns are shown in this graph. Due to the small size of many towns, the educational attainment data of towns should be used with caution and the margin of error of the educational attainment data should be taken into consideration. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and the data should be used with caution.

  • Economically Disadvantaged Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Economically Disadvantaged Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Economically Disadvantaged Overall While Northern Virginia is known for having communities with some of the highest median incomes in the United States, we must recognize that there are segments of the community in need of assistance that live in one of the most prosperous regions in the country. Poverty The Northern Virginia region has some of the highest household incomes in the United States. However, there are persons in poverty in the region, and their needs must be recognized and addressed. The poverty rates of all counties and cities in Northern Virginia are shown in the following graphs. The poverty rate is the ratio of the number of persons in poverty divided by the number of persons for whom poverty status was determined. Not everyone had their poverty status determined so this figure will be less than the total population. About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation Poverty data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). ​It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. Areas with smaller populations, such as the cities of Northern Virginia, may have a larger margin of error in the data due to the survey sample size being small. This is less of an issue the larger the population. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and is not considered statistically significant. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If the data has a clear trend then the data from one period to the next can be deemed reliable Poverty Rate - Current Five-Year Estimates Northern Virginia's poverty rate is 5.9%, compared to 10.0% for Virginia and 12.5% for the nation according to the U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey. All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the five-year American Community Survey estimates. Out of all 3,144 jurisdictions in the USA, two of the fifteen lowest poverty rates are located in the Northern Virginia localities of Falls Church (4th) and Loudoun County (11th). Loudoun County and Falls Church are also the first and second ranked for median household income, respectively. However, there are persons in poverty in Loudoun, Falls Church, and the rest of the region, and their needs must be recognized and addressed. Poverty Rate - Current One-Year Estimates Those jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more are included in the one-year American Community Survey estimates, of which there are 837 jurisdictions. The poverty rate, for those jurisdictions in Northern Virginia with a population of 65,000 or more, is shown in this graph. Out of the 837 jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more in the USA, one of the ten lowest poverty rates is located in the Northern Virginia locality of Loudoun County (7th). Loudoun County is also the number one ranked for median household income. However, there are persons in poverty in Loudoun and the rest of the region and their needs must be recognized. Poverty Rate - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates Northern Virginia's poverty rate has experienced a similar pattern to the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States over time. From 1999 to 2017 there was an increase in the percent of persons in poverty and then in the 2018-2022 period it dropped, yet still above the lowest levels seen in 1999. Poverty Rate - Historic Compared to Current One-Year Estimates The poverty rate patterns over time, for the regions large jurisdictions (population of 65,000 or more), are shown in the following graph. The persons in poverty data has large year-to-year fluctuations due to being collected from a survey with a small sample size. The margins of error are large for the poverty one-years estimates, making any poverty trends undiscernible. The margins of error are displayed in the pop-ups, which appear when hovering over a bar in the graph. Because of the issues with the reliability of the one-year poverty estimates, it is strongly recommended that poverty rate 5-year estimates be used for all Northern Virginia jurisdictions and the region overall when it comes to assessing trends, planning, and making policy decision. The American Community Survey 5-year estimates have a significantly larger sample size. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Expenditures The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) expenditures in Northern Virginia are shown in this graph, including data through December 2023. Since 2011, the peak amount of expenditures was reached in 2022 due to the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic downturn. The COVID-19 pandemic hit the world and its impact on the Northern Virginia region was significant from a health and economic stand point. The temporary boost to SNAP benefits put in place during the COVID-19 pandemic, known as emergency allotments, ended nationwide after the February 2023 issuance. 3040 Williams Drive Suite 200 Fairfax, Virginia 22031 703-642-0700 Sitemap Privacy Policy Accessibility Statement

  • Economics Workforce Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Workforce Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Economic Tracking Labor Force and Unemployment Information on the economic impact and recovery from the coronavirus pandemic in Northern Virginia are found in the Economic Tracking Report. The tracking document includes data and trends on the labor force and unemployment. The report is updated following the monthly release of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Local Area Unemployment Statistics .​ Economic Tracking Report Click on image for document Latest Version released: July 3, 2024 ​ Updates will occur within 3 business days after the following BLS scheduled release dates: July 30, 2024 (June 2024 data) August 28, 2024 (July 2024 data) October 2, 2024 (Aug. 2024 data) October 30, 2024 (Sept. 2024 data) State of the Region: Economic Recovery and Transformation from COVID-19 Pandemic Information on the state of the Northern Virginia region's economic recovery and the transformation from the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic is found in the State of the Region July 2022 report. As society eases back to normalcy, people have been returning to the labor force, but – despite many people returning to the labor force and new entrants to the Northern Virginia labor force – there are currently not enough workers to meet the labor force demands across various industries in the region. The region’s labor force is significantly down from February 2020, there are a high number of job postings, and there is a low unemployment rate. The economic effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and the economic recovery has been uneven across industries and demographic groups in Northern Virginia. Understanding why the Northern Virginia region’s labor force has declined, why those people in Northern Virginia who left the labor force during the pandemic are not returning in full, and how to overcome a shortage of labor is critical to fostering an economy and community where residents and businesses can thrive. This report provides detailed information on these factors. Click on image for report Economic Recovery COVID19 Minority-Owned Businesses Minority-Owned Businesses Minority-owned businesses have experienced heightened risk associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a complex effect on the region’s local economy and on the wellbeing of its minority-owned businesses. Northern Virginia is home to 128,000 minority-owned businesses, representing the community’s diverse fabric and entrepreneurship. The report on Supporting Northern Virginia's Minority-Owned Businesses was released on June 23, 2021. The report contains detailed information on the minority-owned business community, how they were impacted by the pandemic, and recommendations for supporting them through the pandemic economic recovery and in the future beyond the pandemic. The Northern Virginia Minority-Owned Working Group present this report. The group is composed of members from the Northern Virginia Regional Commission, the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority, the Loudoun County Department of Economic Development, the Prince William County Department of Economic Development, Arlington Economic Development, and the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership. ​ A report release webinar event was hosted on June 23, 2021 to highlight the report findings. The event also included other presentations, a fire side chat with leaders from across the region, and testimonies from minority business owners. For the video recording and details on the event see the NVRC demographic webinar series website . ​ Report: The report provides a Northern Virginia level of analysis on minority-owned businesses. Data Dashboard: The dashboard provides a summary of the report findings, interactive data charts, and more detailed information than that found in the report, including jurisdiction level data. ​ The dashboard will be updated on a quarterly basis by the Northern Virginia Regional Commission. Timeline of updates are found on the data dashboard. View Report and Data Dashboard Additional Northern Virginia Workforce Data Resources The NOVA Workforce Regional Overview dashboard provides additional Northern Virginia workforce information, including industry and occupation. This dashboard is provided courtesy of Northern Virginia Community College .

  • 2020 Census | NOVADashboard | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    2020 Census Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Analysis of 2020 Decennial Census NVRC Regional Data Analysis and Analysis Timeline Northern Virginia Regional Commission plans to do extensive data analysis of the region. Results of the data analyses will be posted on this NOVA Region Dashboard are currently posted under the People section. A Hou sing section will soon be added to the dashboard to assess the 2020 Census Results and trends. NVRC's regional analyses utilizing the results of the 2020 Census Demographic Profile and Demographic and Housing Characteristics released by the U.S. Census Bureau in May 2023 will be occur during the 2nd-half of 2023 and will continue into 2024. Note, the 2020 Decennial Census does not provide characteristics on education and economics. ​ Census Bureau Nationwide Data Analysis The Census Bureau is continually publishing 2020 Census analyses through a series of data visualizations , America Counts stories , and videos to help illustrate and explain the Census results and the country's demograph ic characteristics. Access Data and Data Release Timeline The 2020 Decennial Census is being released in multiple phases through multiple products. The Demographic Profile, Demographic and Housing Characteristics, and redistricting data all are injected with random statistical “noise” using the differential privacy approach to prevent disclosure of personal information. Caution should be utilized when using this data. The larger the population size of a geographic area, the more accurate the data and the diminished likelihood of having implausible data with the 2020 Census. The 2020 Census has statistical noise infused to protect confidentiality. The impact of statistical noise decreases with larger geographies. For more information, on the statistic noise injected, privacy, and accuracy, see the information under Privacy and Accuracy of 2020 Census Data . ​ Demographic Profile and Demographic and Housing Characteristics - Released May 2023 The 2020 Census Demographic Profile and Demographic and Housing Characteristics were released. These files contain 2020 Census data on characteristics of the population (i.e. age, sex race), characteristics of households (i.e. household size, rent/own, families). ​ Access and view Northern Virginia regional data: ​ ​County/City County/City Demographic Profile County/City Demographic and Housing Characteristics ​ Incorporated Towns Incorporated Towns Demographic Profile Incorporated Town Demographic and Housing Characteristics ​ ​ Redistricting Demographic Data - Released August and September 2021 Redistricting dem ographic data released to the public. This release contains population, race/ethnicity, age, housing units, and housing tenure data for c ounties, cities, and geographies as small as census blocks. The second product set will contain more detail demographic and housing characteristics data. ​ Access and view Northern Virginia regional data: ​ ​County/City County/City Redistricting Data ​ Incorporated Towns Not Available ​ ​ ​ Detailed Demographic and Housing Characteristics DHC-A - Released September 2023 The Detailed Demographic and Housing Characteristics file will be released in three phases, with the first one being the Detailed DHC-A scheduled for September 2023. Included in this release will be detailed population counts, sex, and age for approximately 370 racial and ethnic groups and places of origin, such as German, Lebanese, Chinese, and Mexican. ​ Detailed Demographic and Housing Characteristics DHC-B - Upcoming Release September 2024 The final Detailed Demographic and Housing Characteristics files to be released are the Detailed DHC-B and the Supplemental DHC (S-DHC). The Detailed DHC-B will include detailed household type (e.g., family or non-famil y) and tenure for approximately 370 racial and ethnic groups and places of origin , such as German, Lebanese, Chinese, and Mexican. The Supplemental DHC will include complex relationships between the characteristics about households and the people living in them, including average household size, average household size by age and tenure, and household and family type for people under 18 years old. Privacy and Accuracy of 2020 Census Data The Demographic Profile, Demographic and Housing Characteristics, and redistricting data all are injected with random statistical “noise” using the differential privacy approach to prevent disclosure of personal information. For the Demographic and Housing Characteristics, the Census Bureau released statistical error metrics (Excel File) to help users understand the variation in the data introduced by using differential privacy. Additional guidance to users is provided by the U.S. Census Bureau in the blog post, What to Expect: Disclosure Avoidance and the 2020 Census Demographic and Housing Characteristics File . ​ For decades, the U.S. Census Bureau has used different techniques to protect individual privacy through their Disclosure Avoidance System (DAS). Differential Privacy (DP) is the latest technique. This technique was chosen because enhanced privacy protection is needed due to advances in technology that enable the ability to identify individuals when combined with other information. DP impacts data accuracy more than any other technique previously applied to decennial census results. DP will add random data (“noise”) to counts for geographic areas below the state level, to prevent identification of individuals. The amount of noise added to the data will be greater than any prior decennial census technique. The impact of statistical noise decreases the larger the population size of a geographic area. ​ From 2019 through 2022, Northern Virginia jurisdictions, through the Northern Virginia Regional Commission (NVRC), participated in the U.S. Census Bureau’s DP demonstration data review and provided feedback to the U.S. Census Bureau. The following document is a brief overview of DP and the impacts it has on data quality. Click on the image to download. For an in-depth description of DP go to the Census Bureau's DP website . Download a copy of the Differential Privacy Fact Sheet Privacy Accuracy

  • Accessibility Statement | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Accessibility Statement Overview Date of last revision: 03/04/21 ​ The Northern Virginia Regional Commission strives to ensure that its services are accessible to people with disabilities and has invested resources to help provide an easy-to-use experience for all visitors to our website, novaregiondashboard.com, regardless of the type of device used and whether a visitor uses assistive technology like a screen reader, font magnification, translation or voice recognition software. The Northern Virginia Regional Commission uses the UserWay Website Accessibility Widget powered by a dedicated accessibility server to improve its compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.1). The Northern Virginia Regional Commission accessibility menu can be enabled by clicking the accessibility menu icon that appears on the corner of the page. After triggering the accessibility menu, please wait a moment for the accessibility menu to load. The Northern Virginia Regional Commission is committed to constantly improving the accessibility of its site. Despite efforts to make all pages and content on NOVA Region Dashboard fully accessible, some content may not have yet been adapted to the strictest accessibility standards as we identify appropriate technological solutions. ​ If you are having trouble accessing content on NOVA Region Dashboard or require assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us . Browser Accessibility Information Many popular browsers contain built-in accessibility tools. Internet Explorer Accessibility Information Firefox Accessibility Information Chrome Accessibility Information Additional Plug-ins Adobe Reader is required to view and print PDF documents that appear on this website. To download this program for free, visit the Adobe website . To read PDF documents with a screen reader, please visit the Adobe Reader Accessibility website which provides useful tools and resources.

  • Immigration Study Education | NOVADashboard | NVRC | Northern Virginia

    Housing Characteristics Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Housing Foreign born headed households, especially those on the lower end of the income spectrum have significantly larger household sizes than U.S. born headed households. COVID-19 More occupants per household present opportunities for transmission of COVID-19 among members within that household since COVID-19 is spread through close contact. ​ Housing instability from the pandemic requires a very proactive role from local communities. 2014 to 2018 Five-Year Estimates Key Facts: ​ Foreign born headed households, in general, are larger than U.S. Born headed households in Northern Virginia and its localities. Northern Virginia has a foreign born average household size of 3.22, while U.S. born headed is 2.39. ​ The gap between the foreign born and U.S. born average household size in Northern Virginia shrinks with each higher income quintile, almost reaching parity at the top among the highest income households. The lowest income quintile has a gap of 0.9 persons per household, while the highest income quintile has a gap of 0.2 persons per household. ​ The housing tenure of the foreign born in Northern Virginia is 58 percent owner and 42 percent renter. This distribution varies widely by locality. The innermost, urban localities of Arlington and Alexandria have a higher rate of renters than the outer, suburban localities. ​ The housing type of the foreign born in Northern Virginia is 60.5 percent single-family, 37.5 percent multi-family, and 2.0 percent other. This distribution varies widely by locality. The innermost, urban localities of Alexandria and Arlington have a majority residing in multi-family and the outer, suburban localities have a majority residing in single-family. Explore housing topics by clicking on the tabs below

  • Immigration Entrepeneurship Covid-19 | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Entrepreneurship - COVID-19 Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Entrepreneurship - COVID-19 Immigrants are job creators In Northern Virginia, immigrant entrepreneurs – those who work for their own businesses, incorporated or not – are making their mark locally. ​ Workers in non-essential industries have been severely affected by the economic fallout of the coronavirus outbreak, especially those who cannot work remotely or whose businesses depend normally on face-to-face interaction. 2014 to 2018 Period Key Facts: ​ More than half of all personal service entrepreneurs in Northern Virginia are foreign born. ​ Between one-quarter and one-half of all entrepreneurs in the non-essential industries of retail trade, healthcare and social services, educational services, professional services, and manufacturing are foreign born.

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