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  • People / Population Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    People / Population Overall About the Overall Population Data Northern Virginia is on the front lines of a demographic transformation shaping the United States. There has been an extraordinary amount of population growth in Northern Virginia. The April 1st Decennial Census population of Northern Virginia was 1,466,350 in 1990, 1,815,197 in 2000, 2,230,623 in 2010, and 2,550,377 in 2020. On July 1, 2022 the Northern Virginia population was estimated to be 2,545,650. Population Migration Births/Deaths Foreign Born Race and Ethnicity

  • People Population Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Population Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Population Northern Virginia is on the front lines of a demographic transformation shaping the United States. There has been an extraordinary amount of population growth in Northern Virginia. In 2022, the Northern Virginia population was 74% more than in 1990 when the population was 1,466,350. Population 2022 Estimate 2,545,650 The COVID-19 pandemic began in the United States in March 2020 and the emergency declaration was lifted in May 2023. The pandemic changed the country's and region's demographic migration patterns significantly due to the substantial rise in remote work. Remote work is providing people with the opportunity to move to places away from employment centers. Most people relocate for family-reasons, housing reasons, and for more affordable, lower cost of living according to the U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey. Young adult, first time home buyers are the largest, working-age demographic group that are choosing to move to more affordable areas. In the four years since the pandemic, the country has had a wave of out-migration from urban areas to suburban and rural areas or smaller urban areas. The shift to remote work is one of the most impactful societal changes impacting demographic trends in the country and region, and likely will shape future trends for a long time. From July 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021, the nation's most populous areas, including Northern Virginia, experienced significant out migration and population declines. This was the first and only annual decline in Northern Virginia since the Census Bureau annual record keeping began in 1970, with a decline of an estimated 7,800 persons. Nationally, by County, and in Northern Virginia, growth patterns of 2022 and 2023 have "edged closer to pre-pandemic levels", according to the U.S. Cen sus Bureau. ​ 2023 Projection Annual Estimates/Trends Decennial Census/Trends ​ Population Projection - 2023 Projection 2023 2,552,276 Projected Growth 2022 to 2023 6,626 The 2023 population estimates for the nation were released in December 2023 by the U.S. Census Bureau. The correlations between the national and regional trends are used to project Northern Virginia's 2023 population, while the region awaits the county-level data that is scheduled to be released by the Bureau on or before March 29, 2024. ​ The Northern Virginia region's trends have closely aligned with the national trends in international migration and natural increase (births - deaths) since 2010, as indicated in the data displayed on the interactive data charts found below in the Annual Estimates and Trends . The most uncertain component of the population is the rate at which the national and regional trend in out-migration from urban areas to areas of lower population and lower cost of living will occur over the coming years because of the societal shift to remote work since the pandemic. This societal shift may have a long-lasting impact on demographic trends in Northern Virginia. In Virginia, between 2022 and 2023, out-migration from urban areas to smaller areas continued, according to an analysis by the Weldon Cooper Center. National-level analysis conducted by demographer William Frey of the Brookings Institute indicates that "as the pandemic subsides and legal, normative, and informal barriers to in-person interaction continue to be lifted, not only will newly formed households begin to add to national migration rates, but established households may also be more inclined to move"*. As indicated in the data and charts found below in the Annual Estimates and Trends , Northern Virginia's net domestic migration in the first year of the pandemic was -32,151 and it was more pronounced in the second year, at -37,414, when more societal barriers to movement and social interaction had subsided. With barriers continuing to subside from 2022 to 2023, Northern Virginia's net domestic migration from 2022 to 2023 is projected to be similar to 2021 to 2022. ​ From July 1, 2022 to July 1, 2023 NVRC's Senior Regional Demographer, Jill Kaneff, projects that the population growth has accelerated but remains slower than pre-pandemic levels . The population growth projection is 6,700. This is higher than the growth of 2,800 from July 1, 2021 to July 1, 2023, yet less than pre-pandemic growth amounts. The projection was developed by analyzing components of change. ​ Net International Migration: The COVID-19 pandemic began in the United States in March 2020. Pandemic global travel restrictions were relaxed near the end of 2021. Following the lifting of pandemic traveling restrictions, there was a significant increase in net international migration for the nation and in Northern Virginia. From 2019 to 2022 Northern Virginia has absorbed 2.3% to 2.6% of the net international migration of the country, with the average being 2.4%. Assuming the average of 2.4%, 26,197 is the projected net international migration for 2022 to 2023. ​ Natural Change: Northern Virginia has been experiencing a similar natural change rate trend since 2019 compared to the nation. The natural change rate per 1,000 persons in the country was 2.1 for 2019-2020 and declined during the pandemic to a low of 0.4 for 2020-2021 and rose to 1.5 for 2022-2023, a rate still below pre-pandemic times. The natural change rate per 1,000 persons in Northern Virginia was 7.4 for 2019-2020. The rate declined during the pandemic to a low of 6.3 for 2020-2021. Mirroring national and regional trends, the projected regional rate is 7.0 for 2022-2023, which would calculate to a projected natural change of 17,905 ​ Domestic Migration: Remote work has shaped new trends that are providing people with the opportunity to move from high cost of living areas such as Northern Virginia to lower cost of living areas. The domestic migration rate per 1,000 persons has nearly doubled since pre-pandemic times, going from -7.8 in 2019-20 to 14.7 from 2021-2022. From 2022-2023 the rate is projected to be the same as 2021-2022, which would calculate to a projected net domestic migration of -37,475. ​ Northern Virginia Regional Commission's projection of growth for July 1, 2022 to July 1, 2023 is similar to the Weldon Cooper Center's estimated population growth of 7,500 for the region, which is derived using a completely different methodology. Given that comparable results were reached using two distinct methodologies, there is high confidence in the reliability of both 2022 to 2023 population growth figures. ​ * Source: William Frey, Brookings Institute, Americans’ Local Migration Reached a Historic Low in 2022, but Long-Distance Moves Picked up, February 2, 2023. Population Projection Annual Estimates Annual Estimates: Population, Natural Change (Births/Deaths), Migration Annual estimates of population and the components of change (domestic migration, international migration, births, and deaths) paint a portrait of the annual growth patterns in the towns of Northern Virginia. Annual estimates are not based on a full census of the population. Rather, they are estimates based on a compilation of multiple administrative data pieces such as birth records and residential building permits. The estimates are obtained from the U.S. Census, which benchmarks estimates to the Decennial Censuses. Decennial Census data represents the population as of April 1 of the year, whereas the annual estimates are as of July 1 of each year. ​ The 2020 to 2022 estimates are benchmarked to the 2020 Decennial Census. The 2010 to 2019 estimates are benchmarked to the 2010 Decennial Census, and the U.S. Census Bureau has yet to be adjust this series to reflect the results of the 2020 Decennial Census. Until data adjustments occur, annual growth amounts may be somewhat overstated or understated from 2010 to 2020. Decennial Population Decennial Census Data: Population The Decennial Census is based on a survey of the entire population. It is conducted once a decade. The 2020 Decennial Census population was released on August 12, 2021. The Decennial Census regional, county, and city population data is shown in the interactive charts that follow. Key Facts: ​ Decennial Growth In 2020, Northern Virginia's population was 2,550,337 according to the Decennial Census. The population increased from 1,466,409 in 1990, a 74% increase in the 30 year period from 1990 to 2020. Northern Virginia added approximately 320,000 people in this past decade, 2010 to 2020. This is 96,000 or 23% less than the previous decade, signaling a significant slowdown in the pace of growth. However, growth still continues at a high amount. Virginia’s population grew by 630,369 from 2010 to 2020, of which 50.7% of that growth was in Northern Virginia. I​​n 2020, 29.5% of Virginia’s population was in Northern Virginia, compared to 27.9% in 2010. Growth peaked in 2010. Growth in Northern Virginia has slowed since 2010. It has trended down annually since 2010, but it is still large and impactful growth that the the region is facing. The localities in Northern Virginia the growth is occurring in this decade is different in some ways than in the 1990s and 2000s. The preponderance of population growth of Northern Virginia continues to be located in the outer-ring suburbs of Prince William, Loudoun Counties, and the Cities of Manassas and Manassas Park. However, the share of the region's growth that is in the outer-ring has dropped from 65.1% in the 2000 to 2010 period to 61.5% in the 2010 to 2020 period. Arlington has seen its share of the region's growth more than double from what it experienced in the 2000's. Alexandria has seen its share of the region's growth become 2.2 times what it experienced in the 2000's. Intensification of developmental pressures this decade in the inner-core is a response to the millennial generation preferences, demographics, urbanization, transportation and other market pressures. ​

  • Reports | NOVADashboard | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Data Reports and Resources Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Fact Sheets Regional Fact Sheet Demographic and Economic Highlights Demographic and economic overview of the region. ​ Last updated: Feb. 9, 2024 Monthly Report Population Change Population change trends before and after the pandemic, including components of change: Domestic migration International migration Births/deaths ​ Last updated: Feb. 22, 2024 Special Report Reports Regional Reports and Studies Economic Economic Tracking Report A report tracking economic indicators, including labor force, employment, unemployment, and industry sectors. ​ Last updated: Feb. 9, 2024 Monthly Report Foreign Direct Investment A report on foreign direct investment that uncovers the depths of economic engagement and activity that Northern Virginia has with the world. Published October 31, 2023. Key highlights of the report are listed in a report infographic. A corresponding m ap highligh ts the countries with direct economic co ntri bu tion s in Northern Virginia. Special Report State of the Region: Economic Recovery and Transformation from COVID-19 Pandemic A report on the state of the Northern Virginia region's economic recovery and the transformation from the COVID-19 pandemic. Published July 2022. Special Report Supporting Northern Virginia's Minority Owned Businesses A study on the minority-owned business community, how they were impacted by the pandemic, and recommendations for supporting them th rough the pandemic economic recovery and in the future beyond the pandemic. Published June 2021. Special Report Immigration One Region: Welcoming New Americans to Northern Virginia A study of the economic impact of immigrants to the region. Published March 2020. Special Report One Region: Addendu m A study addendum to the original report that was published in March 2020. This addendum assessed the economic impact of immigrants relevant to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis response. Published October 2020. Special Report

  • Economically Disadvantaged Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Economically Disadvantaged Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Economically Disadvantaged Overall While Northern Virginia is known for having communities with some of the highest median incomes in the United States, we must recognize that there are segments of the community in need of assistance that live in one of the most prosperous regions in the country. Poverty The Northern Virginia region has some of the highest household incomes in the United States. However, there are persons in poverty in the region, and their needs must be recognized and addressed. The poverty rates of all counties and cities in Northern Virginia are shown in the following graphs. The poverty rate is the ratio of the number of persons in poverty divided by the number of persons for whom poverty status was determined. Not everyone had their poverty status determined so this figure will be less than the total population. About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation Poverty data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). ​It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. Areas with smaller populations, such as the cities of Northern Virginia, may have a larger margin of error in the data due to the survey sample size being small. This is less of an issue the larger the population. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and is not considered statistically significant. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If the data has a clear trend then the data from one period to the next can be deemed reliable Poverty Rate - Current Five-Year Estimates Northern Virginia's poverty rate is 5.9%, compared to 10.0% for Virginia and 12.5% for the nation according to the U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey. All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the five-year American Community Survey estimates. Out of all 3,144 jurisdictions in the USA, two of the fifteen lowest poverty rates are located in the Northern Virginia localities of Falls Church (4th) and Loudoun County (11th). Loudoun County and Falls Church are also the first and second ranked for median household income, respectively. However, there are persons in poverty in Loudoun, Falls Church, and the rest of the region, and their needs must be recognized and addressed. Poverty Rate - Current One-Year Estimates Those jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more are included in the one-year American Community Survey estimates, of which there are 837 jurisdictions. The poverty rate, for those jurisdictions in Northern Virginia with a population of 65,000 or more, is shown in this graph. Out of the 837 jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more in the USA, one of the ten lowest poverty rates is located in the Northern Virginia locality of Loudoun County (7th). Loudoun County is also the number one ranked for median household income. However, there are persons in poverty in Loudoun and the rest of the region and their needs must be recognized. Poverty Rate - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates Northern Virginia's poverty rate has experienced a similar pattern to the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States over time. From 1999 to 2017 there was an increase in the percent of persons in poverty and then in the 2018-2022 period it dropped, yet still above the lowest levels seen in 1999. Poverty Rate - Historic Compared to Current One-Year Estimates The poverty rate patterns over time, for the regions large jurisdictions (population of 65,000 or more), are shown in the following graph. The persons in poverty data has large year-to-year fluctuations due to being collected from a survey with a small sample size. The margins of error are large for the poverty one-years estimates, making any poverty trends undiscernible. The margins of error are displayed in the pop-ups, which appear when hovering over a bar in the graph. Because of the issues with the reliability of the one-year poverty estimates, it is strongly recommended that poverty rate 5-year estimates be used for all Northern Virginia jurisdictions and the region overall when it comes to assessing trends, planning, and making policy decision. The American Community Survey 5-year estimates have a significantly larger sample size. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Expenditures The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) expenditures in Northern Virginia are shown in this graph, including data through December 2023. Since 2011, the peak amount of expenditures was reached in 2022 due to the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic downturn. The COVID-19 pandemic hit the world and its impact on the Northern Virginia region was significant from a health and economic stand point. The temporary boost to SNAP benefits put in place during the COVID-19 pandemic, known as emergency allotments, ended nationwide after the February 2023 issuance. 3040 Williams Drive Suite 200 Fairfax, Virginia 22031 703-642-0700 Sitemap Privacy Policy Accessibility Statement

  • Economics Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Economics Overall About the Overall Economics Data What is it that sets Northern Virginia apart from other places, that gives Northern Virginia its competitive edge, that makes it such a unique, dynamic and interesting place? It’s unparalleled human capital, the people who live here, work here, and come here from all corners of the globe. Proximity to the nation’s capital has transformed Northern Virginia and the entire Washington, D.C. metropolitan area into one of America’s — and the world’s — most dynamic, fastest growing, economically advanced, highly-educated, prosperous, and culturally-diverse regions on the planet. The region has some of the top, most renowned public school systems in the nation. The quality of education in the region's public school systems draws numerous amounts of families to the region. The demographic, social, and economic profile of this region shows it. ​ Median Household Income Household Income Distribution Economically Disadvantaged Workforce

  • Education Attainment Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Educational Attainment Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Educational Attainment Overall Northern Virginia localities are home to some of the most highly educated residents in the nation. This high education level of the region's citizens creates a strong, flourishing business community. The percentage of Northern Virginia's population age 25 or more holding a bachelor's or higher degree is 60.4%, which is nearly double the United States, and holding a graduate or professional degree is 29.4%, which is more than double the United States. About the Data and Proper Data Interpretation Educational attainment data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and the American Community Survey (ACS). ​It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. Areas with smaller populations, such as the cities of Northern Virginia, may have a larger margin of error in the data due to the survey sample size being small. This is less of an issue the larger the population. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and is not considered statistically significant. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If the data has a clear trend then the data from one period to the next can be deemed reliable. Educational Attainment - Current Bachelor's or Higher Degrees - Current Five-Year Estimates All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the five-year American Community Survey estimates. The percentage of residents age 25 or more with bachelor's or higher degrees, for all jurisdictions in Northern Virginia, are displayed in the following graph. Out of all 3,144 jurisdictions in the USA, five of the ten highest ranked for the percentage of residents age 25 or more with bachelor's or higher degrees are located in Northern Virginia. Those include the City of Falls Church (1st), Arlington County (2nd), the City of Alexandria (4th), Fairfax County (5th), and Loudoun County (7th). Overall, Northern Virginia's share is 61.1% for residents age 25 or more with bachelor's or higher degrees, which is well higher than Virginia and nearly twice that of the USA. Bachelor's or Higher Degrees - Current​ One-Year Estimates Those jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more are included in the one-year American Community Survey estimates. For those jurisdictions in Northern Virginia with a population of 65,000, the percentage of residents age 25 or more with bachelor's or higher degrees is displayed in this graph. Out of the 837 jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more in the USA, four of the top six for the percentage of residents age 25 or more with bachelor's or higher degrees are located in Northern Virginia. Those include Arlington County (1st), the City of Alexandria (2nd), Fairfax (3rd), and Loudoun (6th). Graduate or Professional Degrees - Current Five-Year Estimates All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the five-year American Community Survey estimates. The percentage of residents age 25 or more with graduate or professional degrees, for all jurisdictions in Northern Virginia, are displayed in the following graph. Out of all 3,144 jurisdictions in the USA, six of the twenty highest ranked in the percentage of residents age 25 or more with graduate or higher degrees are located in Northern Virginia. Those include the City of Falls Church (1st), Arlington County (3rd), the City of Alexandria (5th), Fairfax County (10th), City of Fairfax (17th), and Loudoun County (19th). Overall, Northern Virginia's share is 29.5% for residents age 25 or more with graduate or professional degrees, which is well higher than Virginia and more than twice that of the USA. Graduate or Professional Degrees - Current One-Year Estimates Those jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more are included in the one-year American Community Survey estimates. For those jurisdictions in Northern Virginia with a population of 65,000, the percentage of residents age 25 or more with graduate or professional degrees is displayed in this graph. Out of the 837 jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more in the USA, four of the twenty highest ranked for the percentage of residents age 25 or more with graduate or professional degrees are located in Northern Virginia. Those include Arlington (1st), the City of Alexandria (3rd), Fairfax County (6th), and Loudoun County (16th). Educational Attainment - Historic Compared to Current Bachelor's or Higher Degrees - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates Northern Virginia is one of the most educated places in the United States. The region's population has experienced an upward trend since 2000 to become even more and more highly educated than it already was. Northern Virginia's age 25 and over population holding bachelor's or higher degrees in 2000 was 50.7% and in the 2017-2021 period was 60.4%, compared to the United States which was 24.4% and 33.7% respectively. This strong growth in highly educated persons creates a strong, growing, and flourishing business community. Bachelor's or Higher Degrees - Historic Compared to Current One-Year Estimates The trend in persons age 25 and over holding a bachelor's or higher degree, for the regions large jurisdictions (population of 65,000 or more), are shown in the following graph. Key Facts: Northern Virginia, as defined for this analysis using the region's five largest jurisdictions, trended upward, increasing from an estimated 54.7% in 2010 to 62.9% in 2022. All of the region's five largest jurisdictions have trended upward since 2010 in their percentage with a bachelor's degree or higher. Arlington and Loudoun Counties have had the the greatest increases. Graduate or Professional Degree - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates Northern Virginia's age 25 and over population holding professional and graduate degrees in 2000 was 22.1% and in the 2017-2021 period was 29.4%, compared to the United States which was 8.9% and 13.1% respectively. Northern Virginia's strong growth in highly educated persons creates a strong, growing, and flourishing business community. Graduate or Professional Degree - Historic Compared to Current One-Year Estimates The trend in persons age 25 and over holding a graduate or professional degree, for the regions large jurisdictions (population of 65,000 or more), are shown in the following graph. Key Facts: Northern Virginia, as defined for this analysis using the region's five largest jurisdictions, trended upward in the college educated population, increasing from an estimated 25.4% in 2010 to 30.8% in 2022. All of the region's five largest jurisdictions have trended upward since 2010in the percentage with a graduate or professional degree. Alexandria and Loudoun have had the the greatest increases.

  • Immigration Study Education | NOVADashboard | NVRC | Northern Virginia

    Internet Access Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Internet Access Limited or no internet access at home can lead to severe economic fallout, from limiting one's ability to work remotely to hindering a small business's transition to online. ​ Limited or no internet access at home puts children in foreign-born households at risk of falling behind as schools hold classes online due to COVID-19. 2014 to 2018 Five-Year Estimates In total, 10.1 percent of Northern Virginians report lacking wired internet access at home. Either they are without any internet access (including no mobile) or they only have mobile access. Immigrants are disproportionately affected. ​ Without Internet Access at Home 4.0 percent of Northern Virginians report lacking access to the internet at home. 6.1 percent of foreign born in Northern Virginia report lacking access to the internet at home, compared to 3.1 percent of U.S. born. Of those without internet access at home, 42.7 percent were foreign born. The total population of Northern Virginia is 27.6 percent foreign born. This indicates that immigrants are disproportionately affected. ​ Only Mobile Access At Home 6.1 percent of Northern Virginians report having only mobile access to the internet at home. 7.7 percent of foreign born in Northern Virginia report lacking access to the internet at home, compared to 5.4 percent of U.S. born.

  • People Race of Towns | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Race and Ethnicity of Towns Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Race and Ethnicity Towns A big story of the region is its diversification and majority-minority transition. There will soon be a day when the majority of people will belong to a minority group (any group other than non-Hispanic White alone). Much of this is attributed to the sizable increases in the number of Hispanics, Asians, and multiracial persons in the region. ​ The following charts show the region's race, ethnic, and minority breakdown for Northern Virginia and its incorporated towns. Hispanic and Latino are displayed separately from race because Hispanic and Latino is an ethnic classification and not a race classification. Hispanic and Latino persons can be of any race. Minorities are defined as anyone other than a person self-identifying as white non-Hispanic. Decennial Census Data The Decennial Census is based on a survey of the entire population. It is conducted once a decade. The 2020 Decennial Census population was released on August 12, 2021. The Decennial Census regional, county, and city population data is shown in the interactive charts that follow. Comparisons of changes in race and ethnicity between 2020 and prior years should be viewed with caution. According to the Census Bureau, “The observed changes in the multiracial population could be attributed to a number of factors, including demographic change since 2010. But we expect they were largely due to the improvements to the design of the two separate questions for race and ethnicity, data processing, and coding, which enabled a more thorough and accurate depiction of how people prefer to self-identify.” For details on the changes please view the U.S. Census Bureau's technical information .

  • Immigration Where to Get Help | NOVADashboard | NVRC | Northern Virginia

    Where to Get Help? Help to Immigrants There are a myriad of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that provide services to immigrants, including refugees. A number of the local governments in Northern Virginia also provide links to information and services. Alexandria City American Civil Liberties Union - Virginia Affiliate American Red Cross Arlington County Government Ayuda CAIR Coalition CASA de Virginia Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Arlington - Hogar Immigrant Services Ethiopian Community Development Council, Inc. Fairfax County Government Just Neighbors Ministry Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) Korean Community Service Center of Greater Washington Legal AID Justice Center Literacy Council of Northern Virginia Loudoun Literacy Council Lutheran Social Services - Refugee and Immigration Services (Falls Church Office) Northern Virginia Family Services SCAN of Northern Virginia Tahirih Justice Center The National Korean American Service & Education Consortium Uceda English Institute of Virginia US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants VOICE

  • People Race Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Race and Ethnicity Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Race and Ethnicity Overall A big story of the region is its diversification and majority-minority transition. There will soon be a day when the majority of people will belong to a minority group (any group other than non-Hispanic White alone). Much of this is attributed to the sizable increases in the number of Hispanics, Asians, and multiracial persons in the region. ​ The following charts show the region's race, ethnic, and minority breakdown for Northern Virginia and its counties and cities. Hispanic and Latino are displayed separately from race because Hispanic and Latino is an ethnic classification and not a race classification. Hispanic and Latino persons can be of any race. Minorities are defined as anyone other than a person self-identifying as white non-Hispanic. Decennial Census Data The Decennial Census is based on a survey of the entire population. It is conducted once a decade. The 2020 Decennial Census population was released on August 12, 2021. The Decennial Census regional, county, and city population data is shown in the interactive charts that follow. Comparisons of changes in race and ethnicity between 2020 and prior years should be viewed with caution. According to the Census Bureau, “The observed changes in the multiracial population could be attributed to a number of factors, including demographic change since 2010. But we expect they were largely due to the improvements to the design of the two separate questions for race and ethnicity, data processing, and coding, which enabled a more thorough and accurate depiction of how people prefer to self-identify.” For details on the changes please view the U.S. Census Bureau's technical information .

  • Education | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Education Information on education of the overall Northern Virginia region and its county and cities. Overall Information on education of Northern Virginia incorporated towns . Towns

  • Economics Workforce Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Workforce Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Economic Tracking Labor Force and Unemployment Information on the economic impact and recovery from the coronavirus pandemic in Northern Virginia are found in the Economic Tracking Report. The tracking document includes data and trends on the labor force and unemployment. The report is updated following the monthly release of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Local Area Unemployment Statistics .​ Economic Tracking Report Click on image for document Latest Version released: February 9, 2024 ​ Updates will occur within 3 business days after the following BLS scheduled release dates: February 6, 2024 (December 2023 data) March 13, 2024 (January 2024 data) April 3, 2024 (February 2024 data) May 1, 2024 (March 2024 data) State of the Region: Economic Recovery and Transformation from COVID-19 Pandemic Information on the state of the Northern Virginia region's economic recovery and the transformation from the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic is found in the State of the Region July 2022 report. As society eases back to normalcy, people have been returning to the labor force, but – despite many people returning to the labor force and new entrants to the Northern Virginia labor force – there are currently not enough workers to meet the labor force demands across various industries in the region. The region’s labor force is significantly down from February 2020, there are a high number of job postings, and there is a low unemployment rate. The economic effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and the economic recovery has been uneven across industries and demographic groups in Northern Virginia. Understanding why the Northern Virginia region’s labor force has declined, why those people in Northern Virginia who left the labor force during the pandemic are not returning in full, and how to overcome a shortage of labor is critical to fostering an economy and community where residents and businesses can thrive. This report provides detailed information on these factors. Click on image for report Economic Recovery COVID19 Minority-Owned Businesses Minority-Owned Businesses Minority-owned businesses have experienced heightened risk associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a complex effect on the region’s local economy and on the wellbeing of its minority-owned businesses. Northern Virginia is home to 128,000 minority-owned businesses, representing the community’s diverse fabric and entrepreneurship. The report on Supporting Northern Virginia's Minority-Owned Businesses was released on June 23, 2021. The report contains detailed information on the minority-owned business community, how they were impacted by the pandemic, and recommendations for supporting them through the pandemic economic recovery and in the future beyond the pandemic. The Northern Virginia Minority-Owned Working Group present this report. The group is composed of members from the Northern Virginia Regional Commission, the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority, the Loudoun County Department of Economic Development, the Prince William County Department of Economic Development, Arlington Economic Development, and the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership. ​ A report release webinar event was hosted on June 23, 2021 to highlight the report findings. The event also included other presentations, a fire side chat with leaders from across the region, and testimonies from minority business owners. For the video recording and details on the event see the NVRC demographic webinar series website . ​ Report: The report provides a Northern Virginia level of analysis on minority-owned businesses. Data Dashboard: The dashboard provides a summary of the report findings, interactive data charts, and more detailed information than that found in the report, including jurisdiction level data. ​ The dashboard will be updated on a quarterly basis by the Northern Virginia Regional Commission. Timeline of updates are found on the data dashboard. View Report and Data Dashboard Additional Northern Virginia Workforce Data Resources The NOVA Workforce Regional Overview dashboard provides additional Northern Virginia workforce information, including industry and occupation. This dashboard is provided courtesy of Northern Virginia Community College .

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